Balanced Spiral Woven

Established & trusted design keeps your process on the move.

Wire Belt Company’s Balanced Spiral belt is an extremely popular mesh design, found in almost every manufacturing industry with a wide ranging number of possible applications. Benefits of Balanced Spiral belt include straight-running operation, an excellent strength to weight ratio and an extremely wide variety of mesh specifications to suit each individual application.

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Balanced Spiral mesh features a simple yet effective design, constructed from alternating left and right hand spiral coils. These coils are held in place by interconnecting crimp rods which run through the width of the belt. The edges of the belt can be supplied either welded or with a knuckled selvedge.

Balanced Spiral gains its excellent tracking properties by employing an alternating pattern which prevents the belt from pulling to one side. Lateral movement within the belt is reduced by the use of specially crimped rods which hold each spiral coil in place.

Balanced Spiral is most commonly supplied as friction-drive belt; however certain meshes can be supplied as Positive-Drive, allowing sprockets to engage with the belts mesh. Alternatively, we can supply Balanced Spiral with chain edges for high load applications.

Cross-Flights and Side Plates are available for inclined applications or product separation requirements. Wire Belt Company also supplies Double Balanced Spiral belting, for applications with particularly high load and/or for products which require a narrower aperture than is possible with standard balanced spiral belts.

Other Specialised Belt Style Applications:

  • Lehr Belts for Glass Annealing
  • Swarf Filter Belts
  • Loose link and Ferrule chain edge for Cryogenic Freezers

Typical Applications:

  • Cooking
  • Heating
  • Cooling
  • Coating
  • Drainage
  • Baking
  • Industrial Curtains
  • Annealing
  • Curing
  • Shrink-Wrapping
  • Lifting Slings
  • Elevating
  • Cladding
 

Belt Types

Standard Balanced Spiral (BS)Standard Balanced Spiral (BS)

The assembly consists of alternating left and right hand coils with each coil interconnecting with the next by means of a crimped cross wire.

For measuring and enquiry details click here.  
For method of belt code identification click here.

 

 

Double Balanced SpiralDouble Balanced Spiral (DBS)

The double balanced assembly is similar to standard balanced spiral but uses coil pairs of each handing intermeshing and then link by means of the crimped cross wire with pairs of intermeshing opposite hand coils on a repeat pattern down the length. This style allows for closer pitching of coils across the width for small product handling.

For measuring and enquiry details click here.

 

Improved Balanced Spiral DiagramImproved Balanced Spiral (IBS)

The structure of this belt is similar to “Standard Balanced Spiral” but uses a straight cross wire with single interconnecting coils in a repeat pattern of left hand/right hand down the length. This assembly allows for a closer pitching of single coils across the width for small product handling.
For measuring and enquiry details click here.

For method of belt code identification click here

 

Improved Double Balanced SpiralImproved Double Balanced Spiral (IDBS)

The structure of this belt is similar to “Double Balanced Spiral” but uses a straight cross wire with double intermeshing coils of each handing interconnecting by means of the straight cross wire in a repeat pattern of left hand/right hand coils down the length. This assembly allows for a closer pitching of coils across the width for small product handling.

For measuring and enquiry details click here.

 


Flat Wire alternatives

In general all of the above styles are available with coil wires manufactured using a flattened wire. When identifying the coil wire it is important to confirm the cross section dimensions.

 

Edge Availability

Welded Edge (W) - mesh only

This is the most common and economical edge finish.  With welding together of both the coil and crimp wires there are not cut wire ends.

 

Laddered Edge (LD) - mesh only

Less common than the welded edge the laddered edge is often used where welds are not desirable for the application.  It is also an option in applications where welding facilities are not available.  The belt edge is also smooth and allows more belt edge flexibility.  It is also more efficient in high temperature applications as the laddered edge is not under operational strain in use and therefore less prone to fracture.  Generally this edge finish is only available for meshes with a relatively large crimp wire pitch down the length.

Hook Edge (U) - mesh only

Also less common than the welded edge type the hook edge is often used where welds are not desirable for the application.  It is also an option in applications where welding facilities are not available.  The belt edge is also smooth and allows more belt edge flexibility.  Generally this edge finish is only available for meshes with a relatively large crimp wire pitch down the length.

Chain Edge Driven Mesh

Along with the above mesh edge finishes these meshes can be driven by side chains using cross rods which are located through the mesh coils and then through chains at the edges of the mesh.  The types of cross rod finish at the exterior of the side chain are as follows:

With welded washer

This is the most common and economical style of finish to a chain edge belt and comprises of a central mesh carried through the system by means of edge chains with carrier cross rods through both mesh and edge chains.  The cross rods are finished at the outside chain edges with a welded washer


 

With Cotter Pin & Washer

Although less economical this type of assembly allows the customer or service personnel the ability to replace the edge drive chains when the mesh and rods are still serviceable.  The assembly comprises of a central mesh carried through the system by means of edge chains with carrier cross rods through both mesh and edge chains.  The cross rods are finished at the outside with a drilled hole to allow the fitment of a washer & cotter pin.  It also allows the repair replacement of sections of belt without the need to grind off rod heads and weld back together.

NB: For greater width stability of rods to chain it is the norm, where possible, to supply the cross rods turned down to go through the edge chains.

Various other styles of chain edge finish include:-

  • Cross rod welded flush to the hollow pin of the side chain.  This is not a preferred standard but may be necessary where width between conveyor side frames and other structural parts create a limitation where "welded washer" or "washer & cotter pin" cannot be used.
  • Cross rod welded flush through drilled hole on inner plates of roller conveyor chain.
In general the chain edge driven belts as shown above are available with 2 styles of edge chain:

Transmission Chain

Transmission chain has a small roller.  The chain edge can be supported either on the chain side plates or by means of a profiled rail to go between the side plates and support on the roller or alternatively without support where the mesh is supported close to the edge.


 

Conveyor Roller Chain

Conveyor Roller Chain has a large roller.  The chain edge can then be supported on a flat angle edge wear strip with the chain roller rotating freely along the conveyor length.






Click here to access the 'Balanced Spiral Mesh' only enquiry form

Click here to access the 'Transmission Chain Edge with Balanced Spiral Mesh' enquiry form

Click here to access the 'Conveyor Roller Chain Edge with Balanced Spiral Mesh' enquiry form

If you are proposing a 'new conveyor application' then click here to access the enquiry form.

Methods of drive

Friction Driven

The most common form of drive is the plain steel parallel roller system.  This system depends on the frictional contact between the belt and roller to ensure drive of the belt.  Variations of this drive type include the lagging of the roller with such materials as rubber, friction brake lining (for high temperature), etc.  The use of such friction lagging materials allow for the operational drive tension in the belt to be reduced,  thus increasing the useful life of the belt.
 

For more 'Friction Driven Conveyor Circuit Design Guidelines' click here

Positive Drive (PD)

The use of specially manufactured sprockets which engage in the mesh of the belt ensures that the belt can be positively driven with the minimum of belt tension and stop belt “Track Off”.  This range of belts is only available in the standard format of “Balanced Spiral” beltings. Click here for the full range of mesh specifications suitable for positive mesh drive



Chain Edge Drive

With this assembly of belt the cross pitch of the belt mesh is manufactured to ensure that the chain edge is the driving medium with the belt mesh being pulled through the circuit by the chains.








Click here for Belt Installation Guidelines

Click here for Belt Tracking Information

Positive Drive Belt Specifications

Mesh Type Specification Coding Nominal Belt Thickness
(mm)
Lateral
Pitch of Coil wire(mm)
Coil Wire Dia. (mm) Crimped Cross Wire Pitch down length (mm) Crimped Cross Wire Dia (mm)
BSW-PD 18-16-16-16 7.7 16.94 1.63 19.05 1.63
BSW-PD 18-14-16-14 8.9 16.94 2.03 19.05 2.03
BSW-PD 30-17-24-17 7.3 10.16 1.42 12.7 1.42
BSW-PD 30-16-24-16 6.7 10.16 1.63 12.7 1.63
BSW-PD 42-18-36-18 6.0 7.26 1.22 8.47 1.22
BSW-PD 42-17-36-17 6.0 7.26 1.42 8.47 1.42
BSW-PD 42-16-36-16 6.4 7.26 1.63 8.47 1.63
BSW-PD 48-17-48-17 6.1 6.35 1.42 6.35 1.42
BSW-PD 48-16-48-16 6.4 6.35 1.63 6.35 1.63
BSW-PD 60-20-48-18 4.0 5.08 0.91 6.35 1.22
BSW-PD 60-18-48-18 5.2 5.08 1.22 6.35 1.22
BSW-PD 60-18-60-18 5.6 5.08 1.22 5.08 1.22
Specifications are also available using a flattened coil wire.  Please consult with our Technical Sales Engineers for the range and availability.

For Drive & Idle Shaft Set-up details click here.

All specifications are supplied with welded edge only.
 

Other Specialised Belt Style Applications:

  • Lehr Belts for Glass Annealing
  • Swarf Filter Belts
  • Loose link and Ferrule chain edge for Cryogenic Freezers
 

Standard Material Availability (Mesh Only)
 

Material Maximum Wire Operating Temperature °C
Carbon Steel  (40/45) 550
Galvanised Mild Steel 400
Chrome Molybdenum (3% Chrome) 700
304 Stainless Steel (1.4301) 750
321 Stainless Steel (1.4541) 750
316 Stainless Steel (1.4401) 800
316L Stainless Steel (1.4404) 800
314 Stainless Steel (1.4841) 1120 (Avoid use at 800-900°C)
37/18 Nickel Chrome (1.4864) 1120
80/20 Nickel Chrome (2.4869) 1150
Inconel 600 (2.4816) 1150
Inconel 601 (2.4851) 1150
NB: Before making a selection for high temperature applications consult with Technical Sales for the most suitable wire grade for the application as wire strength reduces at elevated temperatures.
 

Tracking of Friction Driven Mesh Belts

Belt track off is one of the major causes of belt failure. Incorrect tracking will lead to edge damage and early failure of the belt.
 
The recognised principle is that a friction driven belt will always track perpendicular to the roller over which it passes.  This principle holds good for all rollers in the system.
 
The conveyor should be set up to run with all rollers parallel and level to each other. 
  • As a general rule if the end rollers are not parallel the belt will track off to the short side.
  • Make sure all support beds are level and symmetrical about the centre line of the conveyor.
  • Ensure that the conveyor framework runs straight between the idle infeed and the discharge (drive) roller.
  • Ensure belt support surfaces are free from obstructions (e.g. protruding framework)
  • Do not use crowned rollers to support or drive the belt at any position in the circuit.

Caution: Incorrect installation may result in permanent damage to your belt.

Before installing the belt it is important that the conveyor structure is set up as per the above instructions in a proper aligned and level condition.
 
For belt installation please refer to the “Installation Guidelines”.  Once the belt is installed and set to run in the slow speed mode careful attention should be paid to ensure straight tracking of the belt.  If the belt tracks off to one edge then the following procedure for true tracking should be used which generally means adjusting horizontally the position of the belt support rollers.

During the procedure of belt tracking DO NOT alter the end roller positions once they have been checked and set according to the instructions above.  It is important that they run parallel and level.
 
The following are guidelines for the proper tracking of woven steel beltings: 
  1. To check for proper tracking first mark the belt at several positions down the length at an equal position in from the edge of the belt.  The edge of the belt can also be used if free and clear of any covers or guards. 
  2. The belt should now be run for several complete revolutions at slow speed to allow for settling out of the belt to its running position.  Once the belt has settled to position then measure any track off by means of the belt mark or belt edge relative to a point on the conveyor frame at the infeed end.  This will then indicate the direction and amount of belt track off. 
  3. To adjust the belt tracking please refer to the sketch below and adjust the return support rollers as per indicated in the instructions. 
  4. As a general guideline the roller closest to the infeed should be set at approximately 1¾ times the belt width away from the idle infeed roller.   Adjusting this roller may be sufficient however if you need additional tracking then adjust each roller in turn working away from the infeed.  TIP:  For large amounts of belt tracking correction it is more effective to move many rollers a small amount rather than say one or two rollers a large amount.  If the conveyor has a full wrap snub roller in the return way then adjustment of that roller may be more effective as the full wrap of belt on this roller will produce more lateral belt movement for any given amount of adjustment.
  5. At each stage of adjustment check the lateral belt movement against the previously set reference point at the infeed.  Once the belt lateral movement is stable the belt is then tracked and the rollers should be firmly secured in position.
  6. As final check move to the discharge and check for any lateral belt movement.  If there is movement of the belt at this point then adjust any carry way rollers in a similar fashion to previously.  Adjusting rollers closest to the discharge first and then moving back down the conveyor if further adjustment is required.  In general however if the belt is supported on a symmetrical chevron pattern of wear strips then the belt should self-track at the discharge.
Various other methods of belt tracking can be used under limited circumstances:-
  • Steel angle edge plates, which may be faced with low friction plastic contact surfaces. 
  • Vertical edge rollers.  These have only a single point of contact with the belt and should be used in multiples to help alleviate high pressure contact on the belt edge.
  • Hyperbolic edge rollers which offer a straight line of contact with the belt edge over the length of the roller when set at the designed angle of operation.
 
 
Any of the above can be used as a temporary measure until the belt can be re-tracked as described in the main text above.  They can also be used where the normal method of tracking is not possible or the conveyor is short with light loading, low tension and low speed.
 
There are 6 golden rules when tracking the belt:
  1. Always operate the belt with minimum of belt tension to ensure slip free drive.
  2. Always operate the belt with the minimum belt speed.
  3. Do NOT push the belt edges with excessive force to guide the belt. 
  4. Any type of belt tracking should start at the point of least belt tension.  Normally at the infeed end return way.
  5. Under no circumstances should flanged or crowned rollers be used in an attempt to track the belt.  Both will permanently damage the belt.
  6. The starting point for any edge guides should be no closer than 2 x the belt width from either the drive or infeed idle roller or any other roller where the belt contact is in excess of 30°.
Note:  For Rolled Baking Bands edge roller or guides are NOT recommended.  Only safety trip rollers or photo-electric cells can be used to stop the conveyor should excessive belt wander be encountered.  These should be set at least 10mm from the normal belt edge running position.
 

British Standard Wire Gauge Reference Table

 
British Standard Wire Gauge (SWG) Wire Diameter
(in) (mm)
 
0 0.324 8.23
1 0.3 7.62
2 0.276 7.01
3 0.252 6.40
4 0.232 5.89
5 0.212 5.39
6 0.192 4.88
7 0.176 4.47
8 0.16 4.06
9 0.144 3.66
10 0.128 3.25
11 0.116 2.95
12 0.104 2.64
13 0.092 2.34
14 0.08 2.03
15 0.072 1.83
16 0.064 1.63
17 0.056 1.42
18 0.048 1.22
19 0.04 1.02
20 0.036 0.91
21 0.032 0.81
22 0.028 0.71

Balanced Spiral Woven—Positive Drive Belt

Sprockets & Shaft Set-up Information

As a general guide, the number of sprockets for the drive shaft can be calculated using:-
 
Belt Specification Minimum Number of Sprockets =
(round up)
Maximum Number of Sprockets =
(round down)
BS-W-PD 18-16-16-16
BS-W-PD 18-14-16-14
Belt Width (mm) x 0.006 Belt Width (mm) x 0.014
BS-W-PD 30-17-24-17
BS-W-PD 30-16-24-16
Belt Width (mm) x 0.009 Belt Width (mm) x 0.020
BS-W-PD 42-18-36-18
BS-W-PD 42-17-36-17
BS-W-PD 42-16-36-16
Belt Width (mm) x 0.009 Belt Width (mm) x 0.027
BS-W-PD 48-17-48-17
BS-W-PD 48-16-48-16
Belt Width (mm) x 0.009 Belt Width (mm) x 0.022
BS-W-PD 60-20-48-18
BS-W-PD 60-18-48-18
Belt Width (mm) x 0.010 Belt Width (mm) x 0.032
BS-W-PD 60-18-60-18 Belt Width (mm) x 0.010 Belt Width (mm) x 0.024
 

When choosing the number of sprockets, to use, consideration needs to be given to the length of the conveyor, the loading on the belt and the circuit design. 
If using the minimum number of sprockets (or near to) then, it is recommended that belt support rollers should be included between the sprockets.

Standard Sprocket Sizes:-
 
Belt Specification Code No of Teeth Tooth Rows Overall Diameter Root/Roller Diameter Face Width
BS-W-PD 18-16-16-16
BS-W-PD 18-14-16-14
18-8 4 3 50.5 mm 38.4 mm 50.8 mm
18-12 6 3 75.7 mm 63.5 mm 50.8 mm      
18-14 7 3 87.9 mm 74.9 mm 50.8 mm
18-18 9 3 112.5 mm 100.3 mm 50.8 mm
BS-W-PD 30-17-24-17
BS-W-PD 30-16-24-16
30-8 4 3 34.8 mm 23.8 mm 30.5 mm
30-12 6 3 51.6 mm 40.6 mm 30.5 mm
30-14 7 4* 59.7 mm 48.5 mm 38.1 mm
30-16 8 3 67.8 mm 56.6 mm 30.5 mm
30-18 9 3 76.5 mm 65.5 mm 30.5 mm
30-20 10 3 84.6 mm 73.4 mm 30.5 mm
30-24 12 3 100.8 mm 89.4 mm 30.5 mm
30-26 13 3 108.9 mm 97.5 mm 30.5 mm
BS-W-PD 42-18-36-18
BS-W-PD 42-17-36-17
BS-W-PD 42-16-36-16
42-12 6 4 35.0 mm 25.7 mm 29.0 mm
42-20 10 4 56.4 mm 47.7 mm 29.0 mm
42-24 12 4 67.7 mm 58.4 mm 29.0 mm
42-30 15 4 83.8 mm 74.4 mm 29.0 mm
42-32 16 4 89.3 mm 79.9 mm 29.0 mm
42-40 20 4 110.9 mm 101.6 mm 29.0 mm
42-56 28 4 153.9 mm 144.7 mm 29.0 mm
BS-W-PD 48-17-48-17
BS-W-PD 48-16-48-16
48-20 10 6 43.4 mm 34.0 mm 38.1 mm
48-24 12 6 51.6 mm 42.2 mm 38.1 mm
48-32 16 6 67.6 mm 58.7 mm 38.1 mm
BS-W-PD 60-20-48-18
BS-W-PD 60-18-48-18
60-8 4 5 17.3 mm 11 mm 25.4 mm
60-12 6 5 25.9 mm 19.6 mm 25.4 mm
60-24 12 5 50.8 mm 44.2 mm 25.4 mm
60-42 21 5 86.9 mm 80.3 mm 25.4 mm
60-54 27 5 111.8 mm 103.9 mm 25.4 mm
60-82 41 5 168.4 mm 160.5 mm 25.4 mm
BS-W-PD 60-18-60-18 6060-28 14 5 47.8 mm 39.9 mm 25.4 mm
6060-40 20 6 67.3 mm 59.4 mm 35.6 mm
6060-92 46 6 151.9 mm 143.3 mm 35.6 mm

Typical Drive Shaft Arrangement:-


Suggested Tracking Shaft (Transfer or Idle Shaft) Optional Arrangements:-


Belt circuit should be arranged such that there is sufficient wrap around the sprocket to ensure that the teeth remain engaged with the mesh.

Conveyor Circuit Design Guidelines – Friction Driven

When designing your conveyor it is imperative that you work within the capabilities of the belt selected.

Friction drive belt systems are various and generally depend upon the application in question.  They can vary across temperature range applications from low temperature cryogenic up to 1150°C.  The limitations in general are based upon the product, process and available space.  Click here to download the Conveyor Circuit Design Guidelines.

If you are unsure as to the details enclosed then please call the Technical Sales Team at Wire Belt Company +44 (0) 1795 421771
 

Balanced Spiral Belt Identification

The Wire Belt Company woven wire mesh conveyor belt product code is made up as follows:-

XXX  AA-BB-CC-DD

XXX = Type of belt / Weave (e.g  BSW , CLRW)
AA = The number of coil pitches (spirals) per 305mm (12”) of belt width
BB = The gauge (diameter) of the wire used for the coil wires (spirals)*
CC = The number of connectors (connecting crimp/pins) per 305mm (12”) of belt length
DD = The gauge (diameter) of the wire used for the connecting crimp wires/pins

*If the coil is of flat wire section then this will be expressed as width x depth or the gauge 'F' (i.e. 16F)



The above example indicates a lateral coil pitch count of 48 (8 pitches/2” = 48 pitches/12”of width)
With a longitudinal crimp wire pitch count of 24 (4 pitches/2” = 24 pitches/12” of length)
 
Other suppliers may express the code in the following format:-

XXX   AA-CC/BB-DD
 

Improved Balanced Spiral Belt Identification Codes

The Wire Belt Company woven wire mesh conveyor belt product code is made up as follows:-

IBS  AA-BB-CC-DD

IBS= Type of belt / Weave
AA = The number of coil pitches (spirals) per 305mm (12”) of belt width
BB = The gauge (diameter) of the wire used for the coil wires (spirals)*
CC= The number of straight cross wire connector pins per 305mm (12”) of belt length
DD= The gauge (diameter) of the wire used for the connecting pins

* If the coil is of flat wire section then this will be expressed as width x depth or the gauge ‘F’ (i.e. 16F)



The above example indicates a lateral coil pitch count of 42 (7 pitches/2” = 48 pitches/12”of width)

With a longitudinal crimp wire pitch count of 24 (4 pitches/2” = 24 pitches/12” of length)
 
 

Double Balanced & ‘Improved’ Double Balanced Spiral Belt Identification Codes

The Wire Belt Company woven wire mesh conveyor belt product code is made up as follows:-
DBS/IDBS  AA-BB-CC-DD  
DBS or IDBS = Type of belt / Weave  - Double Balanced Spiral or Improved Double Balanced Spiral (twin coils intermeshed)
AA = Total number of coil pitches (spirals) per 305mm (12”) of belt width
BB = The gauge (diameter) of the wire used for the coil wires (spirals)*
CC= The number of straight cross wire connector pins per 305mm (12”) of belt length
DD= The gauge (diameter) of the wire used for the connecting pins
  • Double Balanced— Crimped Cross Wire
  • Improved Double Balanced—Straight Cross Wire
* If the coil is of flat wire section then this will be expressed as width x depth or the gauge ‘F’ (i.e. 16F)
 


The above example indicates a lateral coil pitch count of 60 (10 pitches/2” = 60 pitches/12”of width)
With a longitudinal crimp/straight wire pitch count of 24 (4 pitches/2” = 24 pitches/12” of length)
 
 

Balanced Spiral Woven Belting Installation Guidelines

Friction and Positive Driven

Preparation

 Before installing a new belt, always check the conveyor structure;
  • Shafts to be at 90̊ to direction of travel, and horizontal.
  • Rollers to be free to rotate.
  • Positive Drive Belts - Sprockets to be correctly positioned, and aligned.
  • Belt supporting surfaces are smooth and level with adequate belt edge clearance. Check that there are no parts of the structure that can catch the belt.
  • If a take-up mechanism is fitted, ensure that it is functioning correctly.

Caution!

It is a characteristic of spiral mesh belts, that coils can twist and so tighten the mesh pitch. This can happen in packing/transit, and in the process of feeding the belt on to the conveyor. Whilst the belt is first being installed, it should be relatively easy to shake out these twisted coils (or scrape them flat). If this is not done, the twisted coils will lock in place as tension is applied. If the conveyor is then run, with twisted coils, belt damaged can occur.




Installation Procedure

Tools you will need:
  • Safety glasses
  • Flat end pliers
  • Needle nose pliers
  • Side cutting pliers
  • Cable ties/soft wire/rope (optional)
  • Pulling rope (optional – for long new conveyor installations)
  • Necessary tools for conveyor belt take up adjuster
  • Welding set to complete the belt edge at the join strand
  1. First ensure that the electrical supply to the conveyor is turned off and the power supply locked out.
  2. Release any conveyor belt tension take up mechanism to allow maximum adjustment during use.
  3. There is no top or bottom side to the belt – either side can be up
  4. Direction of travel – the spiral leads the crimp connector to which it is welded.
  5. The belting should be pulled through the conveyor circuit until the two ends meet.  There are 2 approaches to this:
a)Where the belt is being replaced for a belt in situ on the conveyor. In this instance the existing belt would be cut at the non-drive (normally idle infeed end) and then temporarily attach the lead of the new belt roll to the lagging end of the existing belt.  By means of supporting the new belt roll (whether on a roll or layered on a pallet) you will be able to carefully drive the belt (operate at slow speed) into the conveyor using the existing belt – always maintain suitable belt tension to ensure there is no belt slip on the drive roll.  Whilst the belt is being driven in the old belt should be collected and layered carefully onto a pallet or such like for disposal.  Then continue the process from step 6.
         
b)If fitting the belt to a conveyor where there is no existing belt (such as a new installation) then the belt will have to be fed through the conveyor circuit by hand.  For long conveyors you will need to attach a steel bar to the leading edge of the belt with cable ties or suchlike (see below). To this bar then attach a pulling rope which is first fed through the conveyor to the discharge.  From here the belt can be pulled through the carry way part of the circuit.  Once the lead edge of the belt is at the discharge end the rope should then be fed back through the return way of the belt circuit to the infeed end.  It can then be pulled (maybe with slow speed drive assistance) to the infeed end.  Then continue on from step 6.


6. Excess mesh should be cut off whilst maintaining the correct right/left hand repeat pattern of the coil mesh.  A left hand coil at one end of the belt needs to meet a right hand coil at the other end.
7. Temporarily, the two ends can be tied together; this may make assembly easier
8. The mesh is joined by inserting a crimp wire through the intermeshing coils at each end of the belt.
9. The crimp wire should then be cut to length and welded to the corresponding coil wire, at the edges, maintaining the continuous pattern of the belting.

10. Re-tension the belt enough to maintain adequate drive without over tensioning the belt.
11. Check there are no belt parts or tools left on, or in the conveyor.
12. Remove power lock off and then start the conveyor and test run under slow running conditions before running at normal operating speed.
 
  • Longer belts may be supplied in sections and therefore multiple belt joins will be necessary.
  • If the belt drive shaft is fitted with mesh engaging positive drive sprockets then you will have to disengage the geared motor drive from the drive shaft or operate the conveyor in a slow speed mode to allow the return way belt section to be pulled back whilst being driven.  Always ensure that the new belt section locates correctly into sprocket teeth.
  • If the belt is fitted with side chains and cross rods then it will also be necessary to maintain the side chain pattern when joining the belt.  Side chain driven belts are supplied with two sets of chain connecting links.

Operating Notes!

Sometimes a belt can show signs of surging, hunting or jerking. What could be happening may be an effect sometimes referred to as “slip-stick” which can afflict some longer slow running conveyors using many belt styles. The belt can act something like a spring. The idle end of the belt can remain stationary until belt tension increases to the point that static friction is overcome; the belt can then surge ahead and the resulting drop in tension may then allow the belt to slow, or even stop. The cycle of surging can then become repetitive; if this problem persists then consult the designer or manufacturer of the conveyor.
This effect is normally a function of the following:-
  • Low belt speed.
  • Belt tension.
  • Nature of belt support (coefficient of friction)
To help alleviate some of this effect it may be necessary to change any of the above or a combination of all.
 

Balanced Spiral – Positive Drive Belt Specifications

Mesh Type Specification Coding Nominal Belt Thickness
(mm)
Lateral
Pitch  of Coil wire(mm)
Coil Wire Dia. (mm) Crimped Cross Wire Pitch down length (mm) Crimped Cross Wire Dia (mm)
BSW-PD 18-16-16-16 7.7 16.94 1.63 19.05 1.63
BSW-PD 18-14-16-14 8.9 16.94 2.03 19.05 2.03
BSW-PD 30-17-24-17 7.3 10.16 1.42 12.7 1.42
BSW-PD 30-16-24-16 6.7 10.16 1.63 12.7 1.63
BSW-PD 42-18-36-18 6.0 7.26 1.22 8.47 1.22
BSW-PD 42-17-36-17 6.0 7.26 1.42 8.47 1.42
BSW-PD 42-16-36-16 6.4 7.26 1.63 8.47 1.63
BSW-PD 48-17-48-17 6.1 6.35 1.42 6.35 1.42
BSW-PD 48-16-48-16 6.4 6.35 1.63 6.35 1.63
BSW-PD 60-20-48-18 4.0 5.08 0.91 6.35 1.22
BSW-PD 60-18-48-18 5.2 5.08 1.22 6.35 1.22
BSW-PD 60-18-60-18 5.6 5.08 1.22 5.08 1.22
 
Specifications are also available using a flattened coil wire.  Please consult with our Technical Sales Engineers for the range and availability.

All specifications are supplied with welded edge only.

A range of sprockets in UHMW Polyethylene, POM or Stainless Steel is available to suit each mesh specification.


Typical Standard Bi-Directional Positive Drive Sprocket
(Drives at every 2nd longitudinal crimp wire pitch)
 
Note:  Non-standard moulded versions available for uni-directional drive available to special order.  If sprockets are required for exact replacement then forward picture of existing sprockets to confirm.


Typical Drive Shaft Set-up with Balanced Spiral Flat Wire Belting and Bi-Directional Sprockets.

Trouble Shooting Guide for Friction Drive Woven Mesh Belts

Problem Possible Cause(s) Solution(s)
Belt not tracking properly
  • Product debris build up on rollers or support wear strips
  • Check all rollers and belt support surfaces for debris build up and remove
  • Drive & Idle Infeed rollers not set parallel to each other and 90° to conveyor centre line
  • Adjust Infeed and drive roller so that they are at 90° to conveyor centre line. Do not track belt by adjusting end rollers.  These must be set parallel to each other.  See “Tracking of Friction Driven Meshes” guidelines
  • Belt support rollers not set level and at 90° to conveyor centre line
  • Adjust belt support rollers to be level and at 90° to the conveyor centre line. Return side tracking rollers can then be adjusted horizontally to track belt as per “Tracking of Friction Driven Meshes” guidelines
  • Belt tension/length adjustment rollers are not set to be equal on both sides (must be at 90° to conveyor centre line)
  • Ensure all belt length adjustment rollers are adjusted equally both sides of the conveyor
  • Uneven loading of product
  • Check pattern of loading across width and adjust to give uniform loading
  • Uneven temperature across belt in hot process
  • Uneven temperature across width will cause uneven belt expansion.  This will impact on the drive tension across the width of the belt.  Adjust heaters to give even temperature pattern
  • Belt stretched on edge
  • If belt is stretched on one edge then the belt should be replaced.  As a short-term measure (to continue production) consider flipping over every metre of belting to help balance out the stretch on one side.  Please remember this is only temporary as the belt has been damaged
Note:  It is normal to expect that each belt supplied will track differently to the previous belt.  Refer to the “Tracking of Friction Driven Meshes” guidelines when fitting a new belt Note: Wide belts operating on short conveyors can be difficult to track
 
Belt runs to one side
  • Belt join has been made with the same coil handing
  • Check join – remove one of the same handing coils from the belt and then re-join
  • Belt is of “Chain Link” style with all coils of the same handing
  • Where “Chain Link” belting is installed without chain edges then it is recommended that the belt be manufactured in panel lengths of left hand and right-hand sections to balance out the action of the coil handing over the drive & idle rollers
  • Drive & Idle rollers not set parallel to each other and 90° to conveyor centre line
  • Belt support rollers not set level and at 90° to conveyor centre line
Track belt according to the “Tracking of Friction Driven Meshes”
Belt Runout Note:  There will be some natural wander of the belt over both the drive & idle infeed roller which is due to the slight manufacturing variations in wire formation and tensile.  This is normal and should not exceed 20mm of total travel across the roller.  Therefore, ensure that all rollers & supports are in the order of 50mm to 100mm wider than the belt  
Belt slips on drive roller
  • Conveyor too long for belt specification
  • Load too heavy for belt specification
  • Operating temperature too high for belt specification
 
  • Check with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales with full description of application
 
  • Drive roller too small for application
  • Increased friction between belt and wear strips/support rollers
  • Consider increasing friction contact with drive roller by means of increasing the diameter or increasing the friction of the drive roller surface.  Also consider reducing the friction between wear strips and the belt by using an alternative wear strip material
  • Low or inconsistent belt tension
  • Check operation of tension/belt length adjustment roller mechanism and correct any operational defects
  • Drive press roller (if fitted) does not exert enough pressure trapping the belt to the drive roller to maintain smooth drive operation
  • Increase press roller pressure against belt until smooth belt drive is achieved
  • Ensure press roller operates parallel to the drive roller it is working against
  • Automatic belt take-up is stuck and failing to exert constant tension to belt
  • Check the operation of belt take-up unit and ensure it is free to operate equally on both sides of the conveyor
  • Belt take-up roller is at the end of its travel creating slack in the belt
  • Remove a section of belt, adjust take-up and reconnect the belt ends.  Refer to “Installation Guidelines” for correct procedure
Curve to wire strands across width or Convex/Concave belt camber  
 
  • Belt drag on one edge or position across belt width
 
 
 
 
  • Check for uneven friction across width. It could be a rough wear strip, catching edge, product build up on rollers, uneven temperature across width, etc.  There are many causes so a thorough investigation of the belt circuit and process is necessary.  Contact Wire Belt Company Technical Sales if you are unable to locate and clear the problem.
Note: Belt can be taken off periodically and refitted in the reverse providing camber is not excessive.  Camber will try to straighten and form a new camber as per previous installation.  Do not attempt this procedure if the wire has work hardened and become liable to fracture.
  • Belt spirals worn
  • Inspect belt thoroughly particularly on its underside and replace belt if wear is excessive.  Belt can be turned over if wear is not too excessive
  • Uneven pressure of belt on drive roller if conveyor is fitted with a drive press roller
  • Check and adjust drive pressure roller so that it is acting parallel and with even pressure across the width of mesh on the drive roller
  • Temperature difference across belt is greater than 12°C
  • Reset heat distribution pattern and check for ingress of cool air into the operating environment
Rapid belt wear
  • Belt slips on drive roller – see above.
  • Support wear strips have sharp edges in contact with belt
  • Remove all wear strip sharp edges to present a smooth surface for belt to run over.  There should be no abrupt corners or edges of the support structure to impede smooth belt operation
  • Surface level of carry way belt support wear strips are set too high in relation to the belt underside level as it exits the infeed roller or discharges to the outfeed roller
  • The surface level of the carry way wear strips should be adjusted to the level of the infeed & discharge belt support rollers
Distortion of belt
  • Wear to rollers
  • Check and replace any rollers that are worn and uneven across width
  • Product debris build up on rollers or belt support members
  • Remove all debris and fit constantly operating scraper to any driven roller if debris build up persists
  • Rollers are crowned
  • Drive and end transfer rollers must be straight & parallel (not crowned).  This also applies to any other roller in circuit with belt wrap under tension
Damage to belt mesh coils
  • Incorrect installation of belt.  Balanced spiral belt coils locked in vertical manner when installed.
  • Support wear strips have sharp edges
  • Relax belt tension and smooth out by hand the locked coils. See “Balanced Spiral Installation Guidelines”
  • Remove all wear strip sharp edges to present a smooth surface for belt to run over
Belt corroding prematurely
 
  • Operating atmosphere or temperature not suited to belt specification.  May lead to “Stress Corrosion Cracking”
  • Consult with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales with full details of process application
Belt edge damage
  • Belt has wandered to one edge and is contacting the conveyor frame
  • See above for “Belt not tracking properly” & “Belt runs to one side”
  • Belt may have come into contact with edge tracking rollers, or guide frame, with excessive force
  • It is recommended that belt guides do not interfere with the smooth operation.  Where it is necessary the force exerted should be no greater than 5 newtons
Belt vibration
  • Belt passing over either rough or uneven surfaces or obstructions such as an angle, wear strip edge, etc 
  • Check complete belt circuit and remove any rough or uneven surfaces or obstructions
  • Belt passing over rollers that are set at a distance which is a multiplication of the cross-wire pitch down the length
  • Check position of rollers in relation to the cross-wire pitch multiplicity and alter position if necessary
  • Oval coil spirals passing over small end/drive rollers
  • Check system for vibration at rollers and if present consider increasing the roller size and/or changing the belt specification for a belt with an increased longitudinal coil wire dimension.  Longer lengths of the coil will be flatter.  Also consider a “Flat Spiral” belt alternative
  • Incorrect belt tension
  • Adjust belt take-up to either increase or reduce belt tension and note any change in vibration
Belt surging on carry way infeed
  • Belt speed is slow in relation to working friction between belt and rollers/wear strips.  This surging action is known as the “Slip-Stick” effect where the belt overdrives when moving forward. It then momentarily stops to allow the belt coils to expand and then moves forward again
  • Change the nature of wear strip belt supports to raise or lower friction.  If friction is increased this may have a detrimental effect on the belt and should only be considered after full consultation with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales
  • Belt tension too high or too low
  • Trial the increase or decrease of belt tension and note if belt surging stops
  • Bearing failure of any of the rollers within the belt circuit that are in contact with the belt
  • Check all bearings are free rotating and not damaged.  Replace as necessary
Excessive belt stretch
  • Product load too heavy for belt specification
  • Friction between belt and support rollers & wear strips too high
  • Operating temperature too high for belt specification and/or belt material.
  • Consult with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales to reassess application and belt details.
Black debris build up on belt and conveyor frame structure
  • Normally occurs in the belt “Break In” phase of installation
  • As new all wire of the belt mesh and wear support surfaces have microscopic peaks at the surfaces. This black debris is caused by the peaks of these surfaces rubbing against each other in operation until they become polished and “seat in”. After the “Break In” phase of the belt the system should be thoroughly cleaned.  This process may have to be repeated before this black debris is reduced to an acceptable minimum

Trouble Shooting Guide for Positive Driven Balanced Spiral Belts

Problem Possible Cause(s) Solution(s)
Belt slips on mesh drive sprockets
  • Conveyor too long for belt specification
  • Load too heavy for belt specification
  • Operating temperature too high for belt specification
  • Check with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales with full description of application
  • Increased friction between belt and wear strips/support rollers
  • Consider reducing the friction between wear strips and the belt by using an alternative wear strip material.  Check all support rollers are free to rotate
  • Drive sprockets too small for application
  • Increase the size of the drive sprockets.  Call Wire Belt Company for the most suitable replacement sprockets
  • Sprocket teeth worn
  • Check and replace sprockets.  Always order authentic replacement sprockets from Wire Belt Company
  • Drive sprocket teeth mis-aligned on drive shaft.  Sprockets may have moved out of position
  • Check alignment of sprocket teeth across width with a straight edge and reset if necessary.  Ensure that the sprockets are locked securely to the shaft key
  • Position of sprockets teeth is rubbing against coil wire
  • Check and ensure there is some degree of mesh free float across width on drive and other shafts that are fitted with sprockets
  • Belt catching against leading edge of wear strip or another conveyor frame component
  • Check circuit and correct if belt catches on conveyor system structure
  • Belt back pressure tension to low
  • Increase general belt tension by adjustment of belt take up device.  Do not exert excessive tension on belt as Balanced Spiral Positively driven belts should work with the minimum of tension to ensure proper drive
  • Belt take-up shaft is at the end of its travel creating excessive slack in the belt
  • Remove a section of belt, adjust take-up and reconnect the belt ends.  Refer to “Installation Guidelines” for correct procedure
Rapid belt wear
  • Belt slipping on mesh drive sprockets
  • Check alignment of sprocket teeth across width with a straight edge and reset if necessary
  • Check and ensure there is some degree of mesh free float across width on drive and other shafts that are fitted with sprockets.
  • See above “Belt Slips on Drive Sprockets”
  • Support wear strips have sharp edges in contact with belt
  • Remove all wear strip sharp edges to present a smooth surface for belt to run over.  There should be no abrupt corners or edges of the support structure to impede smooth belt operation
  • Surface level of carry way belt support wear strips are set too high in relation to the belt underside level as it exits the infeed roller/sprocket shaft or discharges to the outfeed drive shaft
  • The surface level of the carry way wear strips should be adjusted to the level of the infeed & discharge belt support rollers and mesh drive sprockets
Distortion of belt
  • Wear to belt support rollers
  • Check and replace any rollers that are worn and uneven across width
  • Product debris build up on mesh drive sprockets or belt support members
  • Remove all debris and fit constantly operating scraper to any in circuit driven roller if debris build up persists
  • Infeed and other rollers with belt wrap do not give full support to belt
  • Check all rollers to ensure that belt is support fully across width.  Shafts where sprockets are fitted should have correct belt support and diameter between sprockets.  Support blanks are available from Wire Belt Company
Damage to belt mesh coils
  • Incorrect installation of belt.  Balanced spiral belt coils locked in vertical manner when installed
  • Relax belt tension and smooth out by hand the locked coils. See “Balanced Spiral Installation Guidelines”
  • Support wear strips have sharp edges
  • Remove all wear strip sharp edges to present a smooth surface for belt to run over
  • Mesh sprockets have moved laterally out of position or have not been set to the correct mesh pitching across the width
  • Check the positions of all sprockets (all shafts) to ensure the teeth are aligned and are acting in the same mesh opening positions across the width
  • Check to ensure there is some side float of the belt across the width at all mesh sprocket shaft positions
  • Check central belt alignment to ensure it is equal at all mesh sprocket shaft positions
Belt corroding prematurely
 
  • Operating atmosphere or temperature not suited to belt specification.  May lead to “Stress Corrosion Cracking”
  • Consult with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales with full details of process application
Belt edge damage
  • Belt may have come into contact with conveyor edge frame, with excessive force
  • Ensure conveyor edge frame is set clear of the belt edge
  • Check for the straightness of the conveyor and re-align if necessary
  • Improper belt support on drive shaft and/or free rotating shafts with mesh sprockets
  • First sprocket tooth at edge should be set into the first clear belt underside opening
  • Free rotating belt support rollers do not give full belt width support
  • Ensure width of rollers are 50mm to 100mm wider than the belt
Belt vibration
  • Belt passing over either rough or uneven surfaces or obstructions such as an angle, wear strip edge, etc 
  • Check complete belt circuit and remove any rough or uneven surfaces or obstructions
  • Belt passing over rollers that are set at a distance which is a multiplication of the cross-wire pitch down the length
  • Check position of rollers in relation to the cross-wire pitch multiplicity and alter position if necessary
  • Where belt wraps around small diameter transfer rollers
  • Due to the linkage pitch of the belt there will always be a small amount of rise and fall in the belt over the roller.  Maximise roller diameters to minimise vibration at roller.  Contact Wire Belt Company Technical Sales for minimum diameters that relate to each mesh
Belt surging on carry way infeed
  • Belt speed is slow in relation to working friction between belt and rollers/wear strips.  This surging action is known as the “Slip-Stick” effect where the belt overdrives when moving forward. It then momentarily stops to allow the belt coils to expand and then moves forward again
  • Change the nature of wear strip belt supports to raise or lower friction.  If friction is increased this may have a detrimental effect on the belt and should only be considered after full consultation with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales
  • Bearing failure of any of the rollers within the belt circuit that are in contact with the belt
  • Check all bearings are free rotating and not damaged.  Replace as necessary
Excessive belt stretch
  • Product load too heavy for belt specification
  • Friction between belt and support rollers & wear strips too high
  • Operating temperature too high for belt specification and/or belt material.
  • Consult with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales to reassess application and belt details.
Black debris build up on belt and conveyor frame structure
  • Normally occurs in the belt “Break In” phase of installation
  • As new all wire of the belt mesh and wear support surfaces have microscopic peaks at the surfaces. This black debris is caused by the peaks of these surfaces rubbing against each other in operation until they become polished and “seat in”. After the “Break In” phase of the belt the system should be thoroughly cleaned.  This process may have to be repeated before this black debris is reduced to an acceptable minimum
Curve to wire strands across width or Convex/Concave belt camber
  •  Belt drag on one edge or position across belt width
  • Check for uneven friction across width. It could be a rough wear strip, catching edge, product build up on rollers, uneven temperature across width, etc.  There are many causes so a thorough investigation of the belt circuit and process is necessary.  Contact Wire Belt Company Technical Sales if you are unable to locate and clear the problem.
Note: Belt can be taken off periodically and refitted in the reverse providing camber is not excessive.  Camber will try to straighten and form a new camber as per previous installation.  Do not attempt this procedure if the wire has work hardened and become liable to fracture.
  • Belt spirals worn
  • Inspect belt thoroughly particularly on its underside and replace belt if wear is excessive.  Belt can be turned over if wear is not too excessive
  • Uneven pressure of belt on drive roller if conveyor is fitted with a drive press roller
  • Check and adjust drive pressure roller so that it is acting parallel and with even pressure across the width of mesh on the drive roller
  • Temperature difference across belt is greater than 12°C
  • Reset heat distribution pattern and check for ingress of cool air into the operating environment

Trouble Shooting Guide for Chain Edge Driven Mesh Belts

Problem Possible Cause(s) Solution(s)
Belt slips on chain edge drive sprockets
  • Conveyor too long for belt specification
  • Load too heavy for belt specification
  • Operating temperature too high for belt specification
 
  • Check with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales with full description of application
 
  • Incorrect match of side chain and associated sprockets
  • Replace sprockets to match chain
  • Edge drive sprockets too small for application
  • Increase the size of the drive sprockets and support mesh roller between sprockets.  Call Wire Belt Company for the most suitable replacement sprockets
  • Increased friction between belt and wear strips/support rollers
  • Consider reducing the friction between wear strips and the belt by using an alternative wear strip material.  Check all support rollers are free to rotate
  • Low or inconsistent belt tension
  • Check operation of tension/belt length adjustment roller mechanism and correct any operational defects
  • Automatic belt take-up is stuck and failing to exert constant tension to belt
  • Check the operation of belt take-up unit and ensure it is free to operate equally on both sides of the conveyor
  • Belt take-up roller is at the end of its travel creating slack in the belt
  • Remove a section of belt, adjust take-up and reconnect the belt ends.  Refer to “Installation Guidelines” for correct procedure
  • Belt back pressure tension to low
  • Increase general belt tension by adjustment of belt take up device.  Do not exert excessive tension on belt as Balanced Spiral Chain Edge driven belts should work with the minimum of tension to ensure proper drive
Curve to wire strands and cross rods across width
  • High friction between belt mesh and support wear strips/rollers
  • Inspect belt circuit to ensure all belt support rollers are free to rotate
  • Cross rods through mesh are too small for the application
  • Wider belts should use a high tensile cross rod or increased cross rod diameter
  • Improper belt support between chain edges on rollers & wear strips
  • Ensure that the support rollers between chain edge sprockets are of the correct diameter
  • There should be sufficient roller support of the mesh between chain edge sprockets on all rollers to prevent mesh distortion
  • Wear strip supports where fitted should ensure the flat operation of the belt in use
Rapid belt wear
  • Chain edge slips on drive sprockets – see above.
  • Support wear strips have sharp edges in contact with belt
  • Remove all wear strip sharp edges to present a smooth surface for belt to run over.  There should be no abrupt corners or edges of the support structure to impede smooth belt operation
  • Surface level of carry way belt support wear strips are set too high in relation to the belt underside level as it exits the infeed roller or discharges to the outfeed drive shaft
  • The surface level of the carry way wear strips should be adjusted to the level of the infeed & discharge belt support rollers
Distortion of belt
  • Wear to rollers
  • Check and replace any rollers that are worn and uneven across width
  • Product debris build up on rollers or belt support members
  • Remove all debris and fit constantly operating scraper to any driven roller if debris build up persists
Damage to belt mesh coils
  • Incorrect installation of belt.  Balanced spiral belt coils locked in vertical manner when installed
  • Support wear strips have sharp edges
  • Relax belt tension and smooth out by hand the locked coils. See “Balanced Spiral Installation Guidelines”
  • Remove all wear strip sharp edges to present a smooth surface for belt to run over
Damage to chain edges
  • Sprocket chain centres across width do not match chain centre to centre of belt
  • Reposition one or both edge sprockets at all positions to match belt chain centres
  • For wider and high temperature operating belts it is normal that only one edge sprocket is fixed in position. The other sprocket is free to float on the keyed shaft to allow for belt expansion and manufacturing tolerances
  • Edge sprocket teeth not in alignment
  • This may occur if sprockets are not keyed onto shaft.  If there are any inaccuracies of keying both the sprockets and shafts then re-machine or replace to rectify the machining error
  • Improper support of chain edge throughout belt circuit
  • Check to ensure that wear strip chain edge support is constant and level where necessary throughout the belt circuit.
  • All wear strips should have an angle or curved lead in to prevent the chain catching
  • Structure of conveyor catching on belt edge
  • Conveyor frame clearance should be 50mm to 100mm wider than overall belt width – depending on width and length of conveyor
  • Centre of belt not in alignment with centre of conveyor throughout belt circuit
  • Check all roller/shaft positions that they are set up to be centrally aligned to conveyor centre line
Belt corroding prematurely
 
  • Operating atmosphere or temperature not suited to belt specification.  May lead to “Stress Corrosion Cracking”
  • Consult with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales with full details of process application
Belt vibration
  • Belt passing over either rough or uneven surfaces or obstructions such as an angle, wear strip edge, etc 
  • Check complete belt circuit and remove any rough or uneven surfaces or obstructions
  • Belt passing over rollers that are set at a distance which is a multiplication of the cross-rod pitch down the length
  • Check position of rollers in relation to the cross-rod pitch multiplicity and alter position if necessary
  • Incorrect belt tension
  • Adjust belt take-up to either increase or reduce belt tension and note any change in vibration. Do not over tension as chain edge driven belts operate with a positive drive mechanism.  Only apply enough tension to ensure drive of belt
Belt surging on carry way infeed
  • Belt speed is slow in relation to working friction between belt, chain edges and rollers/wear strips.  This surging action is known as the “Slip-Stick” effect where the belt overdrives when moving forward. It then momentarily stops to allow the belt coils and chain to expand and move forward again
  • Change the nature of wear strip belt supports to raise or lower friction.  If friction is increased this may have a detrimental effect on the belt and should only be considered after full consultation with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales
  • Belt tension too high or too low
  • Trial the increase or decrease of belt tension and note if belt surging stops
  • Bearing failure of any of the rollers within the belt circuit that are in contact with the belt
  • Check all bearings are free rotating and not damaged.  Replace as necessary
Excessive belt stretch
  • Product load too heavy for belt specification
  • Friction between belt and support rollers & wear strips too high
  • Operating temperature too high for belt specification and/or belt material.
  • Consult with Wire Belt Company Technical Sales to reassess application and belt details.
Black debris build up on belt and conveyor frame structure
  • Normally occurs in the belt “Break In” phase of installation
  • As new all wire of the belt mesh and wear support surfaces have microscopic peaks at the surfaces. This black debris is caused by the peaks of these surfaces rubbing against each other in operation until they become polished and “seat in”. After the “Break In” phase of the belt the system should be thoroughly cleaned.  This process may have to be repeated before this black debris is reduced to an acceptable minimum